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Which Acoustic guitar is Easiest to Play????What brand in over all then what model???


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#1 hermanw1201

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 01:14 PM

There are many types and styles of Acoustic Guitar's , but I was wondering what other people think that is the easiest playing brand, then down to the model if it's in a different brand -- or whatever --- I have a Gibson -- but I recently accuired a Cortley for Free. My justified reason for this question is I don't have a lot of money- as like a bunch of you do and I have been looking for a new acoustic guitar - good brand, easy to play and cheap!! I can't afford another Gibson on my salary? Please Help!!!
Burn rubber not your soul!!!!

#2 rock_slave

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Posted 22 January 2007 - 01:39 PM

its personal opinion test them out at a shop, nice acoustic

#3 dadfad

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 04:52 AM

The ease of playing a guitar is more in the set-up and the strings than anything else. I myself have several Gibsons and that's generally my preference. Some are a little easier to play than others, but if the neck is good and you can set the action nice they all play pretty well. Strings are important and I've found some strings are "stiffer" than others, even of supposedly identical gauges and materials. My preference is D'Addario phosphor-bronze (or webstrings.com's alternative are pretty close) and the guage depending on what you're used to and what you want. If you like mediums, you might find D'Addario's "Bluegrass Guage" a good alternative. They are a hybrid set of mixed lights and mediums so you can get the "bendability" of lights and still keep a more powerful bass (which is one of the things I like about Gibsons anyway).

If you're looking for another less expensive guitar to add, I'm sure everyone has their own preferences. Most of my guitars are relatively high-end, but my son bought me an Alvarez AJ-60 for Father's Day a couple of years ago and I was surprised by what a good playable guitar it was. Of course it didn't have the power of a Gibson, but it was a nice sound, and it was (still is) extremely playable and comfortable. They usually cost less than $500.

< AJ-60

They also make one with electronics (although I've never played one myself) for a little more (about $50 more).

< AJ-60 SC
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#4 hermanw1201

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 07:07 AM

Thanks alot DadFad --- I have seen the Alvarez guitars but never have picked one up!!! So strings make that much of a difference on easy playing.. I may try putting some lighter strings on this Cortley- it's like killing my fingers when I play it!!!
It's like I haven't ever played.
Burn rubber not your soul!!!!

#5 okiejohn

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 07:56 AM

What Dad said, and ya might compare the neck width on the different makes of guitars as well. Some are pretty narrow, some are a bit wider, and that can make a big difference when you play.

My nephew brought his guitar over a few days ago so I could help him with a couple of tunes that he'd heard me working on, and liked. He put his down after a while, and I picked it up and damn....talk about needin' some work. I told the boy that next time he buys a set of strings to get some lights, and bring it over so we could shave about a quarter inch off the bottom of the bridge.

#6 Matt B

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 10:25 AM

I would agree with DADFAD here, Alvarez makes some amazingly affordable and playable guitars. Their Regent Dreadnaughts are also worth a look.

If you can find them, Blueridge makes some really great guitars as well. Or the Epiphone Masterbuilt series. Both of t hose brands run right around the $500-600 new and both sound amazing. One of the two will be my next guitar.

#7 hermanw1201

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 12:24 PM

Thanks Alot -- you guys have been a big help!!! About shaving the bridge --- you don't actualy shave the bridge - do You??
Burn rubber not your soul!!!!

#8 Planetdriver

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Posted 23 January 2007 - 01:55 PM

You remove the bridge and file the bottom until the action is reduced.

Never "shave" the top of the bridge where the strings contact.
Music is the universal language of the Human Race.
No matter what we all play, what styles we listen to,
music is understood by all.
We are all united in our common appreciation of the Art of Music
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#9 dadfad

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 06:04 AM

The first step you look at (if you need to alter the height of the bridge-end) is the saddle that is inserted into the bridge (wooden piece glued to the top). You can lower the saddle's height by shaving the bottom. You can only shave the saddle down so far before the top surface of it gets too close to the bridge and the strings then no longer have enough angle over the top to transfer the vibrations properly into the sound-board (top) of the guitar. That's when you have to look at actually shaving the bridge itself. Like Planet said, you have to remove it from the top (usually by applying heat to soften the glue) and then remove material from the bottom of it, and then re-glue it again to the top. Then you can shave your saddle a little more again.

Removing and replacing the bridge, while not extremely difficult, is still a relatively tedious repair usually requiring a heating iron, special glue and clamps, etc. Merely shaving the saddle is much less difficult. It just (usually) slips out of its slot in the bridge and is easily worked on and replaced. I've posted a couple of times tips on saddle-shaving. I have it copied and I'll put it below.

I'm not saying you need to do this or anything. Maybe your string height is just fine where it is. But just in case you do, here it is.


Lowering The Saddle


Lowering the saddle is easiest done from the bottom usually. Remove it (just loosening the strings is usually enough) and take it out. With a straight-edge draw a pencil line across it near the bottom as sort of a reference to see how much you've taken off. Take a large file and lay it on a table or bench and run the saddle smoothly and evenly across it longways, making sure to keep the saddle both perpendicular and horizontal (unless you WISH to remove more off one side than the other). Check it by putting it back in place and tightening a couple of strings (usually say the 1 and 6 are enough to give you a good idea). Be careful not to remove too much, it's a lot easier to check a saddle a couple of times than it is to take off too much and now have buzzes and need to replace and recarve the whole saddle (a lot harder than lowering it). Anyway, I hope that helps.


Un-plugged is not the same as never-was-plugged-in-to-begin-with.

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When the roll is called up yonder he'll be there...

#10 okiejohn

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 07:01 AM

Oops, that's it, that's the thingamajig, that goesinda.....it's a saddle, not a bridge, that's what I'm gonna shave.

How embarrassing. wacko.gif

#11 hermanw1201

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Posted 24 January 2007 - 11:40 AM

That is what I was wondering -- I need to lower the strings to make it easier to play -- I will try to shave the saddle and let you know how it comes out!! Thanks alot Dadfad and everyone else for your expertice in this matter.... Thanks Thanks Thanks!!!!!
Burn rubber not your soul!!!!

#12 jefftxnaus

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 03:45 AM

That is what I was wondering -- I need to lower the strings to make it easier to play -- I will try to shave the saddle and let you know how it comes out!! Thanks alot Dadfad and everyone else for your expertice in this matter.... Thanks Thanks Thanks!!!!!


i found one of the most affordable and great sounding guitars around right now are seagulls great big sound beautiful work and great price.

#13 ninjato

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 06:23 AM


That is what I was wondering -- I need to lower the strings to make it easier to play -- I will try to shave the saddle and let you know how it comes out!! Thanks alot Dadfad and everyone else for your expertice in this matter.... Thanks Thanks Thanks!!!!!


i found one of the most affordable and great sounding guitars around right now are seagulls great big sound beautiful work and great price.



Seagulls are great but you have to keep an eye on the humidity. I've seen so many owners of Seagulls that their guitars are unplayable due to neglect and lack of humidity. The action at the 12th fret is almost 1/4". I know they don't come from the shop like that.

#14 mdwg

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 07:26 AM

I can't think of an acoustic that plays easier than the Taylor 614ce.

- Great action
- Neck, frets, and fretboard are all really smooth
- Cutaway for upper fret access

Hell it plays better than some electrics tongue.gif

#15 ninjato

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Posted 25 January 2007 - 04:59 PM

I can't think of an acoustic that plays easier than the Taylor 614ce.

- Great action
- Neck, frets, and fretboard are all really smooth
- Cutaway for upper fret access

Hell it plays better than some electrics Posted Image




A short scale DDSM model. Posted Image



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