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Locking the bridge and taking off the tremolo?


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#1 Archaikz

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 07:40 AM

Is it possible on the guitars with tremolos on them to lock the bridge so it doesnt move at all?. I was playing an ibanez RGT42 and I like to rest my hand back on it and everytime I did it would go higher in pitch. It said something about a double locking tremolo. Does that mean i could lock it? Im sorry I dont know to much about them thanks for any help.

#2 bigdude115

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 05:23 PM

The double locking tremolo is simply to lock the strings in tune. Simply put, you can dive the trem bar to the body of the guitar or bend the crap out of the strings and the guitar will stay in tune. If your hand placement changes the pitch, you need to move your hand or put a stop tail bridge on the guitar.

#3 mojomaniac

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 09:06 PM

If you are interested in that guitar, then my advice would be to learn to rest your hand just lightly on the bridge, so that the trem doesn't move. It's not hard to do really, and would be an improvement in your playing, especially if for some strange reason you had to play a guitar with a floating trem in the future, your hand would be trained not to alter the pitch.
You can lock the tremolo off though, there is a lesson on it in the pinned 'FAQ' up top. But if you feel you aren't going to want/need a tremolo then get a guitar without one - it would be easier than blocking it and would cost you less, and since there are tons of RG's you could probably find an almost identical guitar without the trem.
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#4 trickyfingers

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 09:37 PM

Blah. If you have a floating-type bridge, with the counter-springs and whatnot, then do what I did...

1) measure the approximate bridge angle, and distance between the bridge piece and the rest of the bridge cavity

2) cut some wood blocks to the size needed

3) use wooden wedges to lock everything in place.

Bingo! No more trem...you can tune down to your heart's content and changing strings is no longer a 3-day affair...

#5 fingertappinfool

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 08:12 AM

QUOTE (trickyfingers @ Nov 14 2003, 05:37 AM)
Blah.  If you have a floating-type bridge, with the counter-springs and whatnot, then do what I did...

1) measure the approximate bridge angle, and distance between the bridge piece and the rest of the bridge cavity

2) cut some wood blocks to the size needed

3) use wooden wedges to lock everything in place.

Bingo!  No more trem...you can tune down to your heart's content and changing strings is no longer a 3-day affair...

yeah, this is known as "blocking the bridge." I found that when changing the strings on a strat type guitar, it was necessary to do. (You can also block the bridge to keep the right tension on your strings... or you can just leave it in there permanently (no tremelo). Anotehr option (not really recommended) is you can tighten the springs so much that it keeps the bridge flat against the body no matter what... this can be a bad idea. It will produce a lot of tension on your tremelo springs... kind of like having a pulled back bow and arrow in there).
It has also been my expereince that with floyd rose tremelo bridges that are not floating (i.e. you can only lower pitch, not pull up and increae pitch) you don't have to fool around with blocking the tremelo while changing strings. On all the guitars i've ever owned with tremelos such as this (3 guitars) I could take all the strings off, clean the fretboard, and restring without ever having a problem with bridge height/spring tension, etc.)

Edited by fingertappinfool, 14 November 2003 - 08:13 AM.


#6 burnout

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 10:22 AM

for more verstility you could just add more springs. it'll hold better tune but you can still use the whammy to raise the pitch(not as much). but locking the trem would solve this



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