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vocal trainingi need to learn how to sing!!


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#1 boardingpro30foe

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Posted 14 March 2004 - 01:46 PM

-sorry if this is the wrong section-
i can sing , on pitch, and on time. but im by no means a singer. sum times i have to searchy for the pitch while im singing ( i have to shift my voice down or up 1/2 step at a time until i get the right note) but i can hit the note about 70% of the time. im just looking for some techniques or tips for shaping up my voice

-BP30foe

#2 awesem

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Posted 14 March 2004 - 03:20 PM

My sister just happened to be here as i read this post, she says:

This is what I know about controlling voice. The first thing I can think of to say is that it sounds like you're trying too hard and concentrating on finding notes, rather than just going with the song. Coming from the heart usually assures that you get the right note. I really think it sounds like you need to just practice singing heaps, strengthen your voice by singing lots and you'll get the notes easy as pie.

Another tip that relates is about keeping the note stable when you've found it - if you use your pectorial (chest) muscles it helps control the air flow from your lungs which in turn stabilises the notes. If you want more information about singing, look up 'Rotational Body Singing' on the internet and see if you can find a coach to help you out in your area. I studied it for a short while and it has helped me immensely. RBS basically is using your body as an instrument to produce sound in a way that doesn't hurt your voice, and gets the most productive sounds.

I hope this is helpful smile.gif

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#3 Michael Everio

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Posted 09 September 2009 - 05:11 PM

hi, I'm Michael Everio. voice training is the most important thing. My musician friends Chris Freville and Amber Sharman who were professional musicians since 8th October 2000 helped me about it. I think you'd better take someone help too..

#4 ninjato

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 09:50 AM

Your diaphragm controls your air, not your chest muscles.
Embilly, I suggest your sister take real lessons on vocals before offering wrong advice.


#5 Tyroino09

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Posted 06 January 2010 - 02:30 AM

I think she meant the sheet music. Not the CD.


Unless thats what youre talking about and I just misunderstood.

#6 awesem

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Posted 11 January 2010 - 12:19 AM

ignore him, hes a a wannabe knowitall.

I think people here are smart enough to get what they want out of advice and not take it as gospell.
My sister was offering her personal opinion, and if this was my topic I would be greatful for any input.

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#7 caprico

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Posted 12 January 2010 - 05:43 AM

@ninjato

as a matter of fact the chest (intercostal) and the abdominal muscles do contribute in active breathing (not so much in passive breathing, but singing is an active breathing activity).

hence they are termed as accessory respiratory muscles.

wtf is that noise?

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#8 aubreyjames

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Posted 18 March 2010 - 11:28 PM

Hi all you need to do is just practice breathing techniques and controlling the air flow when you have a long note..you do practice and could find the difference.

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#9 Bellatrix

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Posted 25 May 2011 - 06:47 AM

Sometimes to stay in tune (especially on the higher notes), it helps to have good posture.
I know people go on about this all the time, but it is important. Without supporting properly, you could sound wobbly or breathy.

Keep your shoulders down, and lift your chest (imagine meat hooks holding your collarbones up).
Have your feet shoulder width apart.
For the lower of you back, it's hard to describe. But if you're doing it right, it should hurt a tiny bit. It's nothing tp panic about. It's just that we're (as a whole race of humans) aren't used to standing this way.

I don't want to sound too "in your face", but sometimes getting the right posture is very important. It can clear your airways and make it easier to breath.
It might be a good idea to have a few lessons so a professional can put you right where you're going wrong. :)

Edited by Bellatrix, 25 May 2011 - 06:49 AM.


#10 luckydog7

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 08:07 PM

I know how this guy feels. Sometimes I'm dead on and love the way I sing, sometimes I sound like a like a raccoon on fire. I've noticed the more comfortable and relaxed I am the better I sound, and when I sing better my confidence builds and I sing even better. I tend to start really low. So I hung an Elvis picture on the wall of my friends studio, across the room from where I set up. I sing to Elvis, he's the king so I don't wanna let him down lol. Did wonders for my voice projection! I also make weird faces when I sing, probly sounds weird but the more erratic my facial gestures the more consistent I sing. But I struggle when singing in front of someone who's never heard me. I can picture Elvis across the room but I'm too self conscious for my "rockstar" face. Thanks to the previous posted advice I'm gonna work on using my chest muscles more. That hit a nerve with me cause I also play guitar while I'm singing but I've been using a straight mic stand so I'm sure my posture is bad. A boom stand may help me tons, thanks for the great tips!
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#11 docsimon

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 03:47 AM

vocal training is most important in field of singing

#12 Grandpa FrankyZ

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 01:59 AM

My singing teachers, i have had 3 over the years, all have told me the same thing, Breathing, and breath control are the most important part to singing, and it should come from the diaphragm. as one teacher told me it should feel like it is coming from the pit of your stomach, which he calls the bottom of your soul. The diaphragm controls your lungs, and also you can use your abdominal muscles to control your diaphragm so you see it is all interconnected, and singing is in fact a very physically demanding exercise.

Also another trick to sounding "interesting" as a singer, take Bob Dylan for example, not the greatest of voices, but he has made it as a singer, largely due to way he sings. listen to him, listen to the way he works his vocals.

One last thing, and this is to do with the diaphragm. An exercise one of my teachers taught me, was to mimic a didgeridoo. You do this by forcing your breath out of your lungs using your diaphragm, and up through your vocal chords, and holding your mouth in an O shape, and letting your breath go. It is difficult, but it is a great way to train your breathing, your vocal chords, and pitch.


Good luck.


Edit: I forgot to say. your voice is an instrument, treat it as such, and care for it as such.

20 years ago i could not sing a note, i am not a great singer now, but i have performed in bands, and as a solo performer. So i have not done to badly. Also find a genre of music most suited to your voice.

Edited by Grandpa FrankyZ, 02 June 2012 - 02:05 AM.


#13 lowden

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 04:22 PM

Maybe a big help is to relax, practise often and gently. most pitch/tuning issues are best heard a low volumes, so sing gently when rehearsing and keep the band at low volume, this will help the band hear their pitch issues too. By all means when getting ready for a gig give it full whack in the few weeks coming up to it, to give you all the 'feel' of live performing. as was said before many famous artists would not be considered great singers, but they have created their own sound and style, this was not by a clever design by them, it was just their natural way and it resonated with their audience. Be yourself, relax, listen to the singers you like and try to figure out where they breathe, where they push it, where they're softly singing etc.

#14 dadfad

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 08:32 AM

Maybe a big help is to relax, practise often and gently. most pitch/tuning issues are best heard a low volumes, so sing gently when rehearsing and keep the band at low volume, this will help the band hear their pitch issues too. By all means when getting ready for a gig give it full whack in the few weeks coming up to it, to give you all the 'feel' of live performing. as was said before many famous artists would not be considered great singers, but they have created their own sound and style, this was not by a clever design by them, it was just their natural way and it resonated with their audience. Be yourself, relax, listen to the singers you like and try to figure out where they breathe, where they push it, where they're softly singing etc.


Haven't seen you around here recently, Conan. Good to see you drop in!

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#15 lowden

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 11:36 AM

Been a while !! got lost elsewhere in the ether of the internet and the music business, found my way back by accident, all has changed. Glad to hear you're still dishing out the good advice. Will try to keep up this time. :guitar:

#16 xvxfgj

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:15 PM

Hi all you need to do is just practice breathing techniques and controlling the air flow when you have a long note..you do practice and could find the difference.





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#17 satriani08

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Posted 08 August 2012 - 12:43 AM

I've been wanting to learn how to sing too! Good thing I read this thread!
Thank you for sharing you tips guys! :guitar:



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