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Are jumbo frets really that good for shredding?also looking for a good shredding guitar


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#1 Archaikz

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Posted 14 July 2004 - 09:13 PM

I played a schecter today with jumbo frets and it seemed like when i pressed it down i was changing the pitch. Also im looking for a good shredding guitar in the range of $700-750 and im not sure what i want...im not sure what features are better for shredding etc. im looking at right now at this one http://www.music123....c-i116107.music , and this one http://www.music123....d-i132065.music and this one http://www.music123....er-i93773.music .it seems like everybody on chops from hell has a damn ibanez. but i dont think i want to mess with a floyd rose. any help would be great ..thanks

Edited by Archaikz, 14 July 2004 - 09:17 PM.


#2 pimp_vince

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Posted 14 July 2004 - 09:47 PM

yes the premise behind jumbo frets is that you don't have to press hard to get a sound out of the fret. so you can move faster. it also cuts down on bum notes. but the drawback is that if you like to dig in, you will be sharp all the time.

that's the same idea with scalloped fretboards but to a larger extent. i don't like either because i like to dig in and press hard. hence my slow, crappy playing.

#3 gannesh_cyrian

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Posted 14 July 2004 - 10:17 PM

Jumbo frets are a gimmick that appeals and really works for SOME people. I actually think they are a little too big, and I like to shred a lot. The Schecter you played probably just had too high action though.

Do you mean you want a guitar that you can shred on, or do you mean you want a guitar with the typical shredder setup? (you know, 24 frets, floyd rose, etc). If it's the latter, check out some Ibanez neck-thru models as well as Jackson and ESP. Those ones always jump out b/c they are quite popular, but there are plenty of good guitars with that setup.

If it was the former...you can shred on any guitar!! If you can't, it's purely user error.

#4 PavPPZ1

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Posted 14 July 2004 - 11:03 PM

hey joe I have a question for you, your website goes into patterns based on the chromatic scale, where did you find this info i would like to chekc out more of it, is this info used to make different scales??? I want ot ifnd out more about it... thanks

#5 gannesh_cyrian

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 12:20 AM

QUOTE (PavPPZ1 @ Jul 15 2004, 07:03 AM)
hey joe I have a question for you, your website goes into patterns based on the chromatic scale, where did you find this info i would like to chekc out more of it, is this info used to make different scales??? I want ot ifnd out more about it... thanks

Well, everything in our music is based ultimately on the chromatic scale, since the chromatic scale includes all the notes in our system of music (some other systems would be something like with having "quarter steps" - so there would be a new note between E and F in that system).

There are a lot of different patterns you'll find, and all those patterns are meant to be applied to the chromatic scale. I have a book with all the patterns for scales I've ever heard of (and tons I haven't!) -- I can give you some interesting scales that way. (I really don't use any unusual scales though.)

#6 PavPPZ1

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 01:00 AM

the chromatic scale is basically 6 string fret 1 - 4 and all the way down same pattern to 1st string?

#7 atlas_101

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 01:56 AM

QUOTE (PavPPZ1 @ Jul 15 2004, 09:00 AM)
the chromatic scale is basically 6 string fret 1 - 4 and all the way down same pattern to 1st string?

The chromatic scale is just playing every note on the guitar (in a row).
So yea, except on 3rd string the 4th fret is 0 2nd string ^^. But..yeah

#8 ericman197

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:42 AM

Fret size is a preference based on feel. There really is no "best" fret; people use everything from super thin mandolin wire frets to jumbo bass frets on guitars. Legend has it that there are differences between the fret sizes in pressure required to hold the string down, however, that all depends on how you set it up. Fret height can also be used to counter problems in the neck. My set neck bass has a 2 stage large/medium fret setup. The reason for doing this is because set necks tend to ski slope up around the 24th fret regardless of how you set the neck, and by using shorter frets there, this effect is countered. I prefer a shorter fret, as it allows me to feel the wood more. I've also heard that the super short frets have significantly less fret noise and a warmer, woodier sound, but I've yet to actually play a guitar or bass with such frets ( Dingwalls ). Fret width is also important. The wider the fret, the more contact area your string has. However, the narrower the fret, the more precise your tuning and intonation adjustments will be. Using narrow frets has an effect similar to a scalloped neck, as there's less tension between the two frets when you press the string down... think of it like stretching a string with the same tension over 2 wooden blocks vs. 2 knives. The thinner the fret, the deeper the string can be pressed down.

#9 Archaikz

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:55 AM

well i've never really looked at a floyd rose because it just seems like it would be a ###### to string and tune and people say when palm muting it would change the pitch also... i mean is it really as hard to string as people say. ..o yea and thanks PavPPZ1 for hijacking the thread..lil ######.

Edited by Archaikz, 15 July 2004 - 07:56 AM.


#10 ericman197

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:58 AM

QUOTE (Archaikz @ Jul 15 2004, 03:55 PM)
well i've never really looked at a floyd rose because it just seems like it would be a ###### to string and tune and people say when palm muting it would change the pitch also... i mean is it really as hard to string as people say.

Yes, compared to a regular guitar. If you do want a Floyd Rose, there are ways of alleviating some of the problems and making it work for you, it just depends on what you want to do. If you don't want to raise the pitch of notes, it's not that bad. I really wouldn't recommend a Floyd on your main guitar, but if you have a good one already, go for it.

#11 redharmony

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Posted 15 July 2004 - 08:53 AM

i think people over complicate the Floyd Rose system. it can look scary but its not that difficult. i always say you have to have patience with it. just take your time, and its really not that difficult to do. i always listen to a CD or watch tv as i change my strings. (which i did yesterday, and from the time i took off the 1st string to the time i started playing in tune i had about an hours worth of work in it. i like to let the strings set on there for a while and strtch them out. so if you do plan on playing on Thursday, youd better change the strings on Wednesday.) just my opinion

as for junbo frets, i probally wouldnt know the differance between them and regular ones unless someone told me. i think speed has more to do with neck/fretboard desighn

I used to shred, now I draw. 




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