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String bends + vibratohow to...


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#1 builtmyownbass

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 02:30 AM

Is it normal do do vibrato when bending a string up?
I can do it when I bend the string down the fret board (bend towards the ground, and then do a vibrato on it), but is it possible to do the same thing when bending the string the other way? (If I need to do the bend on the B & E strings upwards to avoid going off the side of the neck) Because it is almost impossible to do a vibrato this way.
Is this a common thing that is accomplished by practicing?
Can anyone here do it?
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#2 Crawdaddy

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 04:30 AM

It is possible to do although you wouldn't necessarily do it every time you bend strings up. If a phrase in a song you were playing called for it particularly on the 1st string then you have no other option but to bend up. As with most other things with playing its a matter of practise. If for example you had to bend a string up half a tone and then the note that is reached through the half tone bend is also requiring vibrato then you have to maintain that initial half tone bend position and initiate vibrato from that point.
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#3 hellyea

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 06:51 AM

hmm, this is a very hard technique in my opinion.

personally, i find it hard to do a good bend (actually- thanks for reminding me to practice that!) but to put the vibrato on also-

you are gonna have to have very good finger control basically- do some legato practicing and try to hone the muscle control in your fretting hand fingers.........thats all i can say,.
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#4 Nealio

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 01:17 AM

Practice is all it takes....

#5 grzegorz_panek

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 04:20 AM

Practice, practice, practice!

It is possible, and you need trained fingers and trained ear to do that. Perhaps it's easiest done with the middle finger, resting on ring and pinkie for support.
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#6 Curlee

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 04:59 AM

If you lets go of the neck with the rest of your hand and just push the string upwards and downwards, you can get a slow but cool vibrato. Practise it! smile.gif



#7 gravitas

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 05:22 AM

Here are a few practice tips.

To improve your pitch recognition, make sure and strike the note you're bending up to on the string above at the same time. So if you're bending to an E at the 17th fret on the B string, hit the E on the high E string (12th fret) at the same time, like a double stop. Try it with different note configurations. At first, try bending so that you get perfect unison, then go for bending to get harmony, or even try bending to get the maximum amount of dissonance you can.

Practice on the D string. It's the heaviest gauge string that you can effectively bend up without flying off the fretboard.

Don't practice legato runs to build bending chops. The reason your fingers don't lend so well to bending upward yet is because they have very limited training in that kind of thing. Practicing legato runs will only improve your downward bends. Think of the motions your fingers are going through: the pull-off, in which your fingers retract as is natural for them (ie, pulling towards the floor), and the hammer-on, in which they fall only vertically (so are all but useless in this respect). Neither the hammer-on nor the pull-off will effectively build the muscles required for bending up.

Don't be afraid to bend with all of your fingers! In the early stages of this kind of practice, chances are that none of your fingers are up to speed, so training them all equally is reasonable. However, you will eventually reach a point at which your fingers are strong enough that bending with all of your fingers will not prove to gain anything. Think of a long-distance runner jogging a 400m to prepare for the 25k marathon. At this point, try separate groupments of fingers, like index-middle-ring, or middle-ring-pinky, and then make these groups progressively smaller (pinky-ring, etc.) until you feel that your fingers are strong enough to bend one at a time.

Don't convince yourself that bending two strings at once is impossible. That is a restriction. The easiest way to start building double-string chops (in terms of finger-configuration) is to bend a tritone. The tritone is the most dissonant pairing of notes in Western music. The bottom parts of diminished chords have tritones in them. Play an A and a D# to see what I mean. Progress to bending two strings that are directly adjacent on the fretboard (like G on the low E string and C on the A string).



Hope these tips help you. guitar.gif

#8 Nealio

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 07:28 AM

QUOTE (grzegorz_panek @ Jul 3 2006, 01:20 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Practice, practice, practice!

It is possible, and you need trained fingers and trained ear to do that. Perhaps it's easiest done with the middle finger, resting on ring and pinkie for support.

Yep, that's how I do it.

#9 Nintendo Freak

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Posted 03 July 2006 - 11:54 AM

I can do it, practice is all it takes. I got good at doing a bend-vibrato in about a week (Practicing every day that is! wink.gif ). Sometimes it's even a little hard for me to do it, but once I'm a little warmed up I can do it.

Edited by Nintendo Freak, 03 July 2006 - 11:56 AM.



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