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Combining the Melody and the Chords

melody chords chet atkins the moody blues

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#1 dorio

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 07:16 AM

Since I'm tired of singing (my voice is not that great anyway) I think learning to combine the melody with the chords of songs I already know is a cool thing to try. At the moment I'm trying to combine the melody with the chords to 'Nights in White Satin' and given the easy chords I think I'll be able to do it (I plan to invest the necessary time for this anyway).

To those of you that like to combine melody and chords Chet Atkins style what are the songs you can play that way?

#2 Nealio

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 08:06 AM

If I'm understanding you correctly, John 5 (Ex guitarist for Marilyn Manson) does this in pretty much everything he covers. His version of Gun's N' Roses' "Welcome To The Jungle" is fantastic. I'm not a huge fan or anything, but he's quite talented.

#3 dorio

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 10:58 AM

If I'm understanding you correctly, John 5 (Ex guitarist for Marilyn Manson) does this in pretty much everything he covers. His version of Gun's N' Roses' "Welcome To The Jungle" is fantastic. I'm not a huge fan or anything, but he's quite talented.


I've checked it and yes quite impressive however it's not easy to tell if he plays the melody with the chords of the G&R song or if the melody was recorded separately and mixed with the rest. But if you're sure he does it with the chords on the same track I believe you.

An example of what I mean:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uv6GSYrmFkA

Another example but this time it's featuring stuff I'll never be able to do:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9bajxt02h8

#4 Nealio

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 12:51 PM

Oh, I see what you mean now. No, I'm fairly sure John 5 records the melody seperately.

#5 Grandpa FrankyZ

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 05:12 PM

Norwegian Wood is a good one if played in the key of E, and use your little finger to play the melody whilst strumming the chords. Quite easy as well.

#6 CrazyCal

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 10:45 PM

A mate of mine does this with Queens love of my life.

I think it's quite useful in finding the relationship between scales and chords.

Edited by CrazyCal, 25 May 2012 - 10:47 PM.


#7 tenn_jim

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 12:29 PM

An interesting topic. Funny, but when I read this, I didn't get what your question was. After further thought, I realized you were talking about songs that I learned very early in life. I guess one of the definitive songs that do what your are asking is Wildwood Flower.


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#8 dorio

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Posted 27 May 2012 - 05:57 AM

Norwegian Wood is a good one if played in the key of E, and use your little finger to play the melody whilst strumming the chords. Quite easy as well.


Yes very good example. It's in E with a capo on the 2nd fret. I usually play the (verses) melody with the little finger whilst strumming.

A mate of mine does this with Queens love of my life.

I think it's quite useful in finding the relationship between scales and chords.


Especially when you compose your own music!

An interesting topic. Funny, but when I read this, I didn't get what your question was. After further thought, I realized you were talking about songs that I learned very early in life. I guess one of the definitive songs that do what your are asking is Wildwood Flower.


Nice tune. Thanks :guitar:

#9 Crawdaddy

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 08:06 PM

Here's one along those lines.
Freight Train by Elizabeth Cotton.


SoundClick
--------------------

#10 dadfad

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 04:14 AM

Given the styles I usually play, like Jim I play many tunes that way (probably most tunes I do). Most are acoustic blues/old-time related but others as well. Like Rick said, Norwegian Wood is a good one. However I do it in dropped-D and the melody notes are easily found around the chording. Wildwood Flower that Jim mentioned works well too,

Paul mentioned Freight Train which is probably the quintessential introductory melodic alernating-thumb fingerstyle tune for those getting into that style. Elizabeth Cotten did quite a few recorded versions and she also played a right-handed guitar left-handed (which makes it a bit tricky to play exactly the same way). A few years ago someone asked me to do "a thing" for that tune and so I tabbed a reasonable version with a matching SoundClick sound-file to go along with it (also posted in the Acoustic forum five or six years ago I think) which I'll copy below. The link is below the tab.

FREIGHT TRAIN BLUES
By Elizabeth Cotten (rec. 1957)
Freight train, freight train, runnin' so fast
Freight train, freight train, runnin' so fast
Please don't tell what train I'm on,
They won't know what route I've gone.
When I am dead and in my grave
No more good times here shall I crave.
Place a stone at my head and feet.
Tell them all that I've gone to sleep.
When I die, Lord, bury me deep
Way down on old Chestnut Street
Then I can hear old Number 9
As she comes rolling by.
Freight train, freight train, runnin' so fast
Freight train, freight train, runnin' so fast
Please don't tell what train I'm on,
They won't know what route I've gone.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
This tab is made to work with a sound-byte segment
I've recorded (forgive the poor recording quality).
[ [url="http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=426390"]http://www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandID=426390[/url] ]
On that sound-byte is:
.
0:00-0:26 -Two basic instrumental progressions of the tune
0:27-0:55 -A progression where I've added the first verse
0:56-1:42 -Each line (1-9) of the tab/progression played slowly
1:43-2:47 -Played at full speed using improvs and syncopation
2:48-4:06 -The Real-Deal... Elizabeth herself live in 1966
.
Below is:
.
-The complete tab for the first part.
-The progression positions chorded over a verse.
-Each line 1 through 9 explained in greater detail.
-Some alternative ways to improv and syncopate
-A brief biography of Elizabeth Cotton
.
.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
.
The Complete Tab For The First Progression
.
.
E)--3-------0--------------------------------
B}-------------------3---------1-------------
G)------0-------0---------0---------0--------
D)------2-------2---------2---------2--------
A)--3----------------3-----------------------
E)----------3------------------3-------------
.
E)---------------3-----1---------------------
B}--0---0------------------------------------
G)------------------------0--------0---------
D)------0--------0--------0--------0---------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--3-------3---------3-------3--------------
.
E)--3-------1-------0------------------------
B}--------------------------3----------------
G)------0-------0-------0-------0------------
D)------0-------0-------0-------0------------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--3-------3-------3-------3----------------
.
E)----------------3-----0--------------------
B}--1---1------------------------------------
G)----------------------------0-------0------
D)------2---------2-----------2-------2------
A)--3-------------------3--------------------
E)----------3---------------------3----------
.
E)--0-----------------0----------------------
B}---------------0------------------3--------
G)------1-----------------1------------------
D)------2--------2--------2------------------
A)--2-------------------------------2--------
E)----------0---------0--------0-------------
.
E)-------------------------------------------
B}--1-----------3----1-------1----3----------
G)------2----------------2-------------------
D)------3-------3--------3--------3----------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--1-------1--------1-------1---------------
.
E)---0---------------------------
B}--------------1----------------
G)--------0----------------------
D)--------2----------------------
A)---3----------3----------------
E)-------------------------------
.
E)------------------------------------------------------
B}--------------0------------------------1--------------
G)---0-----0---------0----(to C-chord)--------0---------
D)---------0---------0------------------------2---------
A)--------------2------------------------3--------------
E)---3--------------------------------------------------
.
E)----------------------------------------------------
B}-------0--------------------------1-----------------
G)---0-------(0)-----(to C-chord)---------------------
D)------------0---------------------------------------
A)----------------------------------3-----------------
E)---3------------------------------------------------
.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
.
In its simplest form, here is the tune showing where the simple chord-changes are:
.
[C]Freight train, freight train, [G]runnin' so fast
Freight train, freight train, [C]runnin' so fast
[E]Please don't tell what [F]train I'm on,
They won't [C]know what [G]route I've [C]gone. [G][C]
.
.
.
++++++++ PLAYING IT LINE BY LINE ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
.
Notes for playing line-by-line:
.
I'll take each line above one at a time as simply as possible. This entire arrangement
can be played using only the thumb and index fingers for picking. I'll give a "starting
position" to begin the line from and then how to pick and make changes for the complete
line. For the sake of brevity below I'll use just "s" and "f" to mean string and fret.
For example 4th-string/2nd-fret will be shown 4s/2f, 3rd-string played open would be
3s/0, etc.
.
.
E)--3-------0-------------------------------- (Line 1, out of the C-chord)
B}-------------------3---------1-------------
G)------0-------0---------0---------0--------
D)------2-------2---------2---------2--------
A)--3----------------3-----------------------
E)----------3------------------3-------------
.
First, hold a C-chord X32010 using XRMOIO. (You're going to be adding your
pinky on and off the treble strings and also moving your ring finger back
and forth alternating between the 5th and 6th-strings.) Add your pinky on
the 1st-string/3rd-fret. Now, begin by pinching the 5s/3f and 1s/3f with
the thumb and index. Then thumb the 4s/2f and 3s/O. Moving your ring-finger
over to the 6th-string and raising your pinky up, pinch the 6s/3f and 1s/O.
Thumb the 4s/2f and 3s/O again. Moving your ring-finger BACK to the 5-string
again and also putting your pinky down on the 2nd-string, pinch the 5s/3f
and 2s/3f. Thumb the4s/2 and 3s/O again. Ring goes back to the 6th-string and
pinch 6s/3f and 2s/1f. Thumb the 4s/2f and 3s/O.
.
.
.
E)---------------3-----1--------------------- (Line 2, out of the G-chord)
B}--0---0------------------------------------
G)------------------------0--------0---------
D)------0--------0--------0--------0---------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--3-------3---------3-------3--------------
.
You're going to start with the G-chord 320003. You need to hold it in this
way RMOOOP for making changes in the treble notes and switching to and from
the C-chord more easily. Pinch the 6s/3f and 2s/0, then pinch the 4s/O and
2s/O. Thumb the 6s/3f. Pinch the 4s/O and 1s/3f. Lifting your pinky, add your
index to the 1s/1f (making a G7-chord) and pinch it with the 6s/3f. Thumb the
4s/O and 3s/O. Thumb the 6s/3f, and then thumb the 4s/O and 3s/O.
.
.
.
.
E)--3-------1-------0------------------------ (Line 3, still out of G)
B}--------------------------3----------------
G)------0-------0-------0-------0------------
D)------0-------0-------0-------0------------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--3-------3-------3-------3----------------
.
Pinky back down on the 1s/3f, pinch 6s/3f and 1s/3f. Thumb the 4s/O and 3s/O. Lifting
your pinky and adding you index again, pinch the 6s/3f and 1s/1f. Thumb the 4s/O and
3s/O. Pinch the 6s/3f and 1s/O. Thumb 4s/O and 3s/O. Now put your pinky on the 2s/3f
and pinch it with the 6s/3f. Thumb the 4s/O and 3s/O.
.
.
.
E)----------------3-----0-------------------- (Line 4, back to C-chord)
B}--1---1------------------------------------
G)----------------------------0-------0------
D)------2---------2-----------2-------2------
A)--3-------------------3--------------------
E)----------3---------------------3----------
.
Pinch 5s/3f and 2s/1f. Pinch 4s/2f and 2s/1f. Move ring-finger over to the 6s/3f
and thumb it. Put your pinky on the 1s/3f and pinch that with the 4s/2f. Moving
your ring-finger back over again to the 5-string, pinch the 5s/3f and 1s/O. Thumb
the 4s/O and 3s/O. Ring back to the 6-string again, thumb 6s/3f. Then thumb 4s/O
and 3s/O.
.
.
.
E)--0-----------------0---------------------- (Line 5, out of the E-chord)
B}---------------0------------------3--------
G)------1-----------------1------------------
D)------2--------2--------2------------------
A)--2-------------------------------2--------
E)----------0---------0--------0-------------
.
Hold the E-chord 022100 OMRIOO. Pinch the 5s/2f and 1s/O. Thumb the 4s/2f and 3s/1f.
Thumb the 6s/O. Pinch the 4s/2f and 2s/O, then pinch 6s/O and 1s/O. Thumb 6s/O. Then
thumb4s/2f and 3s/1f again. Thumb 6s/O. Now, adding your pinky to the 2nd-string on
the third fret (to form an E7-chord), pinch the 5s/2f and 2s/3f.
.
.
.
E)------------------------------------------- (Line 6, out of an F-chord)
B}--1-----------3----1-------1----3----------
G)------2----------------2-------------------
D)------3-------3--------3--------3----------
A)-------------------------------------------
E)--1-------1--------1-------1---------------
.
Use this F-chord 10321X held TORMIX. You'll need it to easily make the simple change in
this position. You can make the common F barre-chord if you want but it's MUCH easier
this way. Pinch the 6s/1f and 2s/1f. Thumb the 4s/3f and 3s/2f. Thumb the 6s/O. Pinch
the 4s/3f and (adding your pinky to the 2nd-string) 2s/3f. Pinky back off and pinch 1s/O
and 2s/1f. Thumb the 4s/3f and 3s/2f. Pinch the 6s/1f and 2s/1f again. Then (pinky back
down again) pinch 4s/3f and 2s/3f.
.
.
.
E)---0--------------------------- (Line 7, a quick C-chord)
B}--------------1----------------
G)--------0---------0------------
D)--------2---------2------------
A)---3----------3----------------
E)-------------------------------
.
Pinch the 5s/3f and 1s/O. Thumb 4s/2f and 3s/1f. Pinch 5s/3f and 2s/1f. Thumb 4s/2f
and 3s/1f.
.
.
.
E)------------------------------------------------------ (Line 8, a quick G to C
B}--------------0------------------------1-------------- combination)
G)---0-----0---------0----(to C-chord)--------0---------
D)---------0---------0------------------------2---------
A)--------------2------------------------3--------------
E)---3--------------------------------------------------
.
Pinch 6s/3f and 3s/O. Thumb 4s/O and 3s/O. Pinch 5s/2f and 2s/O. Thumb 4s/O and 3s/O.
Then (changing to a C-chord) pinch 5s/3f and 2s/3f and thumb 4s/2f and 3s/O.
.
.
.
E)--------------------------------------------------- (Line 9, an even quicker
B}--------0------------------------1----------------- little G-to-C end-tag to
G)---0-------0------(to C-chord)--------------------- the progression)
D)-----------0---------------------------------------
A)---------------------------------3-----------------
E)---3-----------------------------------------------
.
Change back to the G-chord pinching the 6s/3f and 2s/1f. Then use the index to pick
the 2s/O and quickly thumb the 4s/O and 3s/O in sort of a combination move with a
sort of "twist" to it. (Like playing "dum a-dum"). Change to the C-chord and resolve
the progression by pinching the 5s/3f and 2s/1f.
.
And that's it!
.
.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

ALTERNATE WAYS OF PLAYING POSITIONS IN THE PROGRESSION ABOVE
These are some alternate ways to play parts within the progression. They
aren't necessarily tabbed as a complete progression below, just a bit of
variations that can be substituted in parts of the above tab which might
add a bit of variety and syncopation, similarly to how I played the more
stylized syncopated progression in the sound-byte. I won't try to explain
each little move on them because once you've done the lines above it's
pretty apparent how to do these below. Anyway, just a few ideas to try.
.
.
E)--3--------0-------------------------------------------- from C
B}-----1-----------------3---------1----------------------
G)--------0--------0--------0-------------0---------------
D)-----------------2-----------2----------2---------------
A)--3--------------------3--------------------------------
E)--------------3----------------------3------------------
.
E)-----------------------------------1------------------ from G
B}------------------0--------3--------------------------
G)---0------2-------------------------------------------
D)------0---------------0--------0----------0-----------
A)------------------------------------------------------
E)---3---------3-------------3-----------3--------------
.
E)--3----------0--------------------------------------- from G
B}-----0----------------3---------0--------------------
G)-------0---------0-------0---------------------------
D)-----------------0---------0---------0---------------
A)-----------------------------------------------------
E)--3----------3--------3----------3-------------------
.
E)----------------------------------------------------- from C
B}--0h1------------------------------------------------
G)-------0---------------------------------------------
D)-------2---------------------------------------------
A)---3-------------------------------------------------
E)-----------------------------------------------------
.
E)--------------0--------------0----------------------------- from E
B}---------------------0------------------3------------------
G)---0h1------------------(1)------(1)----------(to F-chord)-
D)--------2----------------2--------2-----2------------------
A)-----------------------------------------------------------
E)----0------------0-----------0-----------------------------
.
E)---------------------------------------------0------------ from F
B}---1----------3----------------------1-------------1------
G)------2----------(F into a D9-chord)-------------------2--
D)------3-------3---------------------------0------------0--
A)----------------------------------------------------------
E)---1-----1--------(move thumb up)----2----------2---------
.
E)------------------------------------------------------------ from G
B}--------------------0--------------------------1------------
G)--0-------2-----------------(into C-chord)---------0--(etc)-
D)------0-----------------0--------------------------2--------
A)-----------------------------------------------3------------
E)--3------------3--------------------------------------------
.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
.
ELIZABETH COTTEN
.
Elizabeth Cotten was born in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in 1895. She
began playing at about age eight on her brother's banjo. She soon learned
guitar as well, playing her brother's and her father's instruments. This
is one of the reasons her exact fingerstyle pattern is so hard to play
exactly like she did. She was left handed and because she had no guitar
of her own she simply reversed the position of those normal right-hand
strung guitars and played them with the strings upside-down, picking with
her left hand, fretting with her right. Her thumb picking the treble
lines while her fingers picked the bass. Unless you are a left-handed
guitarist who learned the same way she did (like Robert Cray for example),
it would be extremely difficult to duplicate exactly the way she played.
.
She'd become a single-mother and a domestic by her early teen years. When
she joined the church, she gave up playing (many Black churches back then
believed the guitar "the Devil's instrument" in a very literal way). She
eventually moved north, living in New York City and still working as a
maid. Her affiliation with the Pete Seeger family actually began shortly
after moving th Washinton, DC. when Mrs. Seegar was shopping in a downtown
department store. Her young daughter had wandered away and gotten lost.
Elizabeth found the child and returned her to Mrs. Seeger. The grateful
Mrs. Seeger offered her a job as the Seeger's maid.
.
One day while cleaning alone in Seeger's music-room, she took a guitar down
from the wall and began playing it. Seeger came in and she was afraid she
would lose her job and quickly hung it back up and apologized, but instead
he asked her to play some more and was extremely impressed by her skill.
Soon afterwards Seeger, who was quite a popular musician, fell out of favor
with the public and record labels in that McCarthy Era because he was a Com-
munist. A few years later as that era wound down and he regained popularity
again, he helped establish Cotten's career as a folk-blues artist during the
Folk Revival of the early '60s. She toured a great deal and was recorded by
several blues historians. She also appeared several times on television,
including Pete Seeger's public-TV show "Rainbow Quest." She retired as a
domestic around 1970 and not long after began to tour full-time. Near the
end of her life she was given a National Endowment for the Arts National
Heritage Fellowship Award as a living national treasure and also won a
Grammy as well in 1979 for a compilation of her tunes in the best Tradi-
tional Music category.
.
In the years before she died she continued to play until very near the end.
I was fortunate enough to see her in concert in very early 1987 where she
shared the bill with (of all people) Donovan. While her playing was weakened
by her age, it was still delicate and beautiful, her voice clear. She died
at the age of 92 on June 29th, 1987.
.
.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ END +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

http://www.soundclic...0&content=music

Un-plugged is not the same as never-was-plugged-in-to-begin-with.


 
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When the roll is called up yonder he'll be there...


#11 dorio

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 07:34 AM

Paul mentioned Freight Train which is probably the quintessential introductory melodic alernating-thumb fingerstyle tune for those getting into that style. Elizabeth Cotten did quite a few recorded versions and she also played a right-handed guitar left-handed (which makes it a bit tricky to play exactly the same way). A few years ago someone asked me to do "a thing" for that tune and so I tabbed a reasonable version with a matching SoundClick sound-file to go along with it (also posted in the Acoustic forum five or six years ago I think) which I'll copy below. The link is below the tab.



Great tab John. That's really one of those tunes I could do. I was trying earlier today and the tab had a G7 in the verses and E7 in the chorus it's not that it doesn't sound great but I think your version sounds more like the real thing with the major chords. Thanks for the soundclick it helps a lot. On the subject of Mrs Cotten's guitar I'm also a lefty playing on right handed guitars. Perhaps this will help to nail the tune sooner. Never owned a lefty guitar actually.
Many thanks to you John and Paul.

To summarize a bit based on what's been posted so far I note 3 different styles to play this type of delicate songs. I believe the third way is what is known as a form of fingerstyle :

- Playing the melody with your fretting hand whilst strumming like Norwegian Wood.
- Playing the melody with a pick with your right hand (left for me) whilst strumming.
- Picking the melody with your right hand whilst you pick the harmony and bass.

As a sidenote seems like Maybelle Carter and Elisabeth Cotten were using what appears to be like thick gauges for acoustic guitars.

#12 tenn_jim

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 12:32 PM

As a sidenote seems like Maybelle Carter and Elisabeth Cotten were using what appears to be like thick gauges for acoustic guitars.


I believe all Maybelle used was Black Diamond medium gauge strings. She used her beloved Gibson L5 for all of her sessions.
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#13 Crawdaddy

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 05:01 PM

On the subject of Mrs Cotten's guitar I'm also a lefty playing on right handed guitars. Perhaps this will help to nail the tune sooner. Never owned a lefty guitar actually.
Many thanks to you John and Paul
.


You're welcome.
It was the first tune I thought of after reading your post.

Off the original topic but on the subject of lefty guitarists flipping over righty guitars, Albert King is another that played that way, Otis Rush, Dick Dale, Doyle Bramhall II, Jimmy Cliff are some others as well.
SoundClick
--------------------

#14 tenn_jim

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 05:52 AM

R.I.P. Doc Watson.

Doc was one helluva guitar picker who was most definitely adept at playing the melody with the chordal backing. Give a listen:


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#15 dadfad

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:30 AM

R.I.P. Doc Watson.

Doc was one helluva guitar picker who was most definitely adept at playing the melody with the chordal backing. Give a listen:


And a truly nice guy I've been told.

(Whose heart was broken by the death of his son and playing-partner, Merle, in a tractor accident back in the '80.)

I saw him and Merle once, listened to his stuff more times than I could count. In my own mediocre way, I had to go play "Deep River Blues" in his memory when I heard the news last night.



"...dig a hole in the meadow, deep in that cold cold ground
and gather 'round all you kind friends, see this poor rounder down.
...sweet Heaven when I die..."


RIP, Doc.

And give Merle our best.






...


Un-plugged is not the same as never-was-plugged-in-to-begin-with.


 
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When the roll is called up yonder he'll be there...


#16 Matt B

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 03:45 PM

A sad day for music. A sad year really, losing both Earl and Doc.

#17 harrumphicus

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 09:55 AM

The only song I've ever tried it on is "Just Like Heaven" by The Cure - pretty easy to do, actually. There's a lot of ukelele players that can do it fantastically. Don't know any off hand, but do a youtube search for Beatles Uke covers, there's one guy in particular that's really good at it. I'd post the video myself, but youtube doesn't work out here on the ocean.

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#18 surfwhammy

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:04 AM

One of my favorite examples of combining chords and melody is the way Prof. Díaz plays "Hotel California" (Don Felder) in Rumba style, which is fabulous . . .

[NOTE: The first approximately two-thirds of the music video lesson is interesting, but I like the last part where after playing the simple Rumba version of the the chords for "Hotel California", Prof. Díaz is a bit bored or perhaps frustrated by having to play in such a simple way, so he has what one might call a "Latin moment" and switches into hyperdrive and plays the chords and melody simultaneously in a way that is mind-boggling, because he makes it look so easy. It is more FUN when you watch the entire music video lesson, where after Prof. Díaz and student Tommy Vrazalis play the song as a duet, Prof. Díaz demonstrates how to play the song at various skill levels, which includes explaining Rumba strumming techniques, but I like the part that begins with Prof. Díaz, saying "or you can do it with the arpeggio", where he plays the chords, bass line, and melody simultaneously, which certainly is possible to do if you have been playing Flamenco guitar proficiently at least for three or so decades; have a Doctorate in Music; and teach Flamenco guitar . . . ]

"Hotel California" (Don Felder) -- Tommy Vrazalis and Prof. Díaz -- YouTube music video lesson

Prof. Díaz: ". . . or you can do it with the arpeggio" :laugh2:


Fabulous! :guitar:
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#19 dorio

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 07:45 AM

As a sidenote seems like Maybelle Carter and Elisabeth Cotten were using what appears to be like thick gauges for acoustic guitars.


I believe all Maybelle used was Black Diamond medium gauge strings. She used her beloved Gibson L5 for all of her sessions.


Must have been an optical illusion (I have eye problems these days).

On the subject of Mrs Cotten's guitar I'm also a lefty playing on right handed guitars. Perhaps this will help to nail the tune sooner. Never owned a lefty guitar actually.
Many thanks to you John and Paul
.


You're welcome.
It was the first tune I thought of after reading your post.



You have dechiffered my unconscious desire to take the fingerstyle route. I'm hooked to 'Freight Train Blues' playing it with different rythms and melodies the goal being to catch melody and timing as described in John's megatab and soundclip. Quite a fantastic tune. it's incredibly delicate.


Off the original topic but on the subject of lefty guitarists flipping over righty guitars, Albert King is another that played that way, Otis Rush, Dick Dale, Doyle Bramhall II, Jimmy Cliff are some others as well.



Rereading my last post I would like to clarify a couple of things. It's a fact that I can play with a righty guitar with lower E down higher E up I learned that way for parties to save me reversing the strings of guitars that didn't belong to me that way I learned some open chords however I don't play 'Freight Train Blues' the Elizabeth Cotten's way I play it with the lower E up. When I said "I'm also a lefty playing on right handed guitars" I meant in a very limited way and occasionally nowadays.


The only song I've ever tried it on is "Just Like Heaven" by The Cure - pretty easy to do, actually. There's a lot of ukelele players that can do it fantastically. Don't know any off hand, but do a youtube search for Beatles Uke covers, there's one guy in particular that's really good at it. I'd post the video myself, but youtube doesn't work out here on the ocean.


I've heard a great 'While My Guitar Gently Weeps' rendition once. Wish I had the time for this but guitar takes all of my free time already.

Regarding 'Hotel California' Prof Diaz's way works well sounds lovely with index and thumb picking too.

#20 Crawdaddy

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 10:27 PM

Here's a clip of Roy Rogers pretty much combining everything on Robert Johnsons Terraplane Blues.
This might be a bit hard to tab John.



Roy giving some insight into Johnsons playing style.




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