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anyone have hints on how to make up a good solo or lead

solo lead guitar composing tips help writing solos

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#1 rosenberg

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Posted 03 November 2001 - 05:38 AM

hi i just started composing seriously. and i just can't get good leads and solos. can someone help me.

#2 gyr84me

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Posted 03 November 2001 - 07:53 AM

The best way to write solos or lead parts is to improvise. What I tend to do is record myself playing the rhythym guitar part and then record me improvising a couple of different parts. Listen back to all the bits you record and select the best parts from each recording. It can take a while to work out exactely what you did and to be able to link it all together, but it's worked well for me in the past. Other solos etc are just what ever comes naturally - practice improvisation as much as you can and learn your scales and modes. Write what ever YOU want to - it's your song and if you like it, someone else will like it!!

#3 thetragichero

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Posted 04 November 2001 - 08:57 AM

i think that the most important part of any solo is the very first note. thats the note that catches your attention and pulls you into the solo. make sure that the first note is totally wicked, and the rest will fit into place.

#4

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Posted 06 November 2001 - 08:43 AM

Try to folow the cord progretion, like hit the root every now and again. phrase around the note u are on in teh song and most of all take it slow, your guitar is like your voice you need to take breaths!

#5 halfmoonbay

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Posted 07 November 2001 - 07:00 AM

Improvise....... Just mess around and see what you come up with. Even if you only come up with a little riff or lick, write it down becuase it might come in useful. I've got an archive with dozens and dozens of little riffs or phrases that I came up with, sometimes when I'm writing a song I'll find one that I wrote months ago and I'd forgotton about and it fits, so I use it. anyway, back to the point, there's no real scientific way of doing it, you're just got to experiment. Have fun.
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#6 holger

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Posted 07 November 2001 - 10:43 AM

Yes, improvise, that's the best way of
doing it. It may sound stupid, but let your
fingers lead you. I mean you shouldn't have to plan what sounds would be good,
just play!

#7 ronnie ronnie

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Posted 04 May 2004 - 12:34 PM

let it flow

#8 egnot

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Posted 04 May 2004 - 12:39 PM

i find if your stuck and none of your improvs are fitting particularly well, you can fall back on the old staple of playing the vocal melody as the solo. Guaranteed to fit with the song. If i was to do that though, I'd try to add some embellishments and additions to it, just to make it more interesting

#9 _brad_

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Posted 05 May 2004 - 11:08 PM

so how is ur playing going i mean u have had 2 years to work on it, wait 3 years geez thats a long time since this guy posted this

#10 neveralone

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Posted 07 May 2004 - 06:16 AM

QUOTE (_brad_ @ May 6 2004, 09:08 AM)
so how is ur playing going i mean u have had 2 years to work on it, wait 3 years geez thats a long time since this guy posted this

laugh.gif laugh.gif laugh.gif

#11 MarieAnne

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Posted 19 January 2010 - 07:55 AM

You could always search Google for some online tips on how to. Been a great help before when i started out composing songs.


#12 CannonsAhoy

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 11:35 AM

You could always search Google for some online tips on how to. Been a great help before when i started out composing songs.


Haha well if that isn't a necropost I don't know what is.


Made an account just to comment on this...

#13 surfwhammy

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 10:27 AM

Successfully reprogramming the Frontal Eye Fields region of the brain to work cooperatively and productively with the Auditory Cortex simply by thinking about it for a while, along with becoming proficient in music notation and discovering how to compose and play lead guitar in real-time on the fly off the top of your head, as well as becoming intimately attuned to the musical instructions routinely beamed into your mind by the Metrosexual Aliens from Outer Space™ who currently are circling our planet in low-Earth orbit as they frantically search for the Mirror Matter Popcorn™ they "misplaced" during what they imagined would be a "happy picnic" outside Roswell, New Mexico in the late-1940s and is used to power their Hilbert Space Hopper Drive™ helps considerably, which is fabulous . . .

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Fabulous! :doh:
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#14 lowden

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 04:37 PM

Dave Gilmour used to get 4 tracks on the 24 track recorder for Pink Floyd sessions. He'd improvise on 3 of those tracks and mix the best bits onto track 4. A long and enjoyable process that has been lost recently due to infinate tracks on digital. Sometimes limiting yourself to a set number of tracks can bring out the best. take the 1st bit from trk 1, the 2nd bar from trk 3, 3rd bar was great on trk2, then combine these into trk 4 to create a solo. You then learn that solo for your live performance. It's an edited version of you, but it's the best bits of you. Dave Gilmour probably has some of the sweetest solos ever played and all were improvised and then combined.

#15 w00dy

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 05:53 AM

Dave Gilmour used to get 4 tracks on the 24 track recorder for Pink Floyd sessions. He'd improvise on 3 of those tracks and mix the best bits onto track 4. A long and enjoyable process that has been lost recently due to infinate tracks on digital. Sometimes limiting yourself to a set number of tracks can bring out the best. take the 1st bit from trk 1, the 2nd bar from trk 3, 3rd bar was great on trk2, then combine these into trk 4 to create a solo. You then learn that solo for your live performance. It's an edited version of you, but it's the best bits of you. Dave Gilmour probably has some of the sweetest solos ever played and all were improvised and then combined.

what an interesting bit of knowhow

Heres a tip from me - if your song contains only the major chords C, F, G or the minor chords A, D, and E then you go as mad as you like on all the white frets

   ------->Numbers<-------

        ^^latest musics^^

go on give it a listen, it's good.

 


#16 surfwhammy

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 01:21 PM

Dave Gilmour used to get 4 tracks on the 24 track recorder for Pink Floyd sessions. He'd improvise on 3 of those tracks and mix the best bits onto track 4. A long and enjoyable process that has been lost recently due to infinate tracks on digital. Sometimes limiting yourself to a set number of tracks can bring out the best. take the 1st bit from trk 1, the 2nd bar from trk 3, 3rd bar was great on trk2, then combine these into trk 4 to create a solo. You then learn that solo for your live performance. It's an edited version of you, but it's the best bits of you. Dave Gilmour probably has some of the sweetest solos ever played and all were improvised and then combined.

what an interesting bit of knowhow


Definitely interesting and enlightening! :yes:

David Gilmour obviously is able to play the lead guitar solos on Pink Floyd songs note-for-note in concert, hence the lead guitar solos are composed, and it is interesting to know one of the ways he did it (or perhaps "the way" he did it) . . .

Heres a tip from me - if your song contains only the major chords C, F, G or the minor chords A, D, and E then you go as mad as you like on all the white frets


This is a brilliant observation, and it also works with a diminished B chord, where the 3rd and 5th notes are minor or flatted, which is the case because there are seven (9) classical music modes (Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian), where one of the mnemonics is "I Don't Play Lydian Mode A Lot" . . .

But it also works with other chords, as Prof Diaz explains in the following music theory video, becuause one can play a major scale (a.k.a., "Ionian" mode) at a relative offset to specific notes in other modes and the notes of the major scale will be the same as the notes of one of the other modes . . .

Modes Applied to Flamenco (Prof. Diaz) -- YouTube music theory video

[NOTE: I need to ponder this for a while, which at some point inevitably will require devising an algorithm, since I think that there is lot more to this than is immediately obvious when one allows the root note to change by using a different fret rather then nut (a.k.a., "zeroth fret") as the defining position for the "white keys" pattern, which is something that one can do easily on guitar in the same way that what I call a "low" major Barre chord, which has its root note on the low-pitch "E" string wiill be a G major chord when plalyed at the 3rd fret but will be an A major chord when played at the 5rh fret, yet it is the same pattern. Explained another way, there is only one set of white keys on a piano, and these map to specific notes on a guitar fretboard, but the root note that anchors the "white keys" pattern on a guitar can change easily by moving the pattern upward or downward by some number of frets or semitones, where there is a specific set of chords that work when the anchor or root note of the "white keys" pattern is E, but I suggest that there is another set of chords that work when the anchor note of the "white keys" pattern is F, and so forth and so on, which makes it an intriguing puzzle . . . ]

And while there are no "white keys" on a guitar fretboard, there is a one-to-many mapping of white keys on a piano to notes on a guitar fretboard, as shown in the following diagram, really . . .

[NOTE: It is a "one-to-many" or "1-to-many" relationship, because there are "many" ways to play some of the notes on guitar, so the mapping is 1 piano key to many notes on the guitar fretboard, where for example on a guitar that has 24 frets, there are 5 ways the E above Middle C, where for reference Middle C on a guitar at standard tuning is the note at the 1st fret of the high-pitch "b" string, although using the relative guitar clef, Middle C is considered to be note at the 3rd fret on the low-pitch "A" string, but this note actually is Low C, which tends to cause a lot of confusion, since until you focus on absolute pitch and scientific pitch notation, it is easy to presume quite incorrectly that Middle C is the note at the 3rd fret of the low-pitch "A" string, when the fact of the matter is that Middle C actually is the note at the 1st fret of the high-pitch "b" string, but so what . . . ]

Posted Image

Really!

There are subpatterns, and I used different fill colors for the dots to identify some of the easier subpatterns, but it is a bit busy visually . . .

Posted Image

And while this can be a bit mind-boggling at first, I think this is the way at least a few "play by ear" lead guitar players conceptualize lead guitar phrases, which might be done using finger patterns (for example, "3-1-3-1") or whatever, and I think that most people can memorize where stuff is located in a grocery store, which is one of the things I like to do, except that instead of memorizing the location of everything in a grocery store, I like to memorize the location of everything in a Walmart Supercenter . . .

When one of the biggest conceptual errors in classical music theory is corrected by requiring that each note have one and only one name, everything becomes a bit easier, since the white keys on a piano are the ones that are not flat or sharp, which maps to being alphabet characters without a prefixed or suffixed flat or sharp sign {C, D, E, F, G, A, B}, where in contrast the sharped notes are {C#, D#, F#, G#, A#}, which keeps everything extraordinarily simple, since the entire set of 12 notes is {C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B}, where the octaves range from 0 to 10, although I focus primarilly on octaves 1 through 8, which maps to 96 notes, with the exception that really deep bass is vastly important, where for reference C0 is 16.362-Hz, which makes it "subsonic" with respect to the full-range of normal human hearing (20-Hz to 20,000-Hz), hence is perceived as a rumbling vibration of the body rather than heard as an actual tone . . .

Posted Image
Scientific Pitch Notation ~ C0 through C9

[SOURCE: Scientific Pitch Notation (wikipedia) ]

[NOTE: Here in the sound isolation studio, there are no flats--only sharps--since I prefer to go up rather than to go down, where for example there is A# rather than B♭, although since one cannot entirely avoid being in a musical group with horn players, I understand the logic for having flats, but I generally avoid using it . . . ]

Another helpful rule is to avoid having more than one key, where C Major is the best key signature, because it requires doing nothing when one is working in music notation other than adding sharps when a note does not sound good without an added sharp . . .

On piano and most other instruments, with the exceptions of concert harps, strings, guitars, marimbas, xylophones, voice, and so forth, it is not so easy to conceptualize music as having 12 notes and 8 octaves, but so what . . .

So what!

The excellent aspect of the exceptional instruments and voice is that you only need to learn one set of patterns, since playing or singing in a different key signature, mode, or whatever mostly is a matter of moving upward or downward in a linear way, since the set of patterns is relative to whatever one considers to be the "1st fret" or the "root fret", and the finger stuff is the same, which for guitar players is the only thing that makes being in a musical group with horn players tolerable . . .

[NOTE: If you learned the song in A, but the horn players demand that you play it in B♭, then so long as you learned it using Barre chords, all you need to do is move up one fret, since the pattern is the same, which is not a big deal and does not require a significant change in finger placements and so forth, where in contrast moving upward by a half-step on piano requires a lot of significant changes in finger placements and so forth, as is the case for woodwinds, horns, and other types of keyboard instruments that have white and black keys or whatever, although I suppose that with a keyboard synthesizer it should be possible to learn a song one way and then cause it to be played in a specific key by changing the reference pitch. . . ]

SUMMARY

When you first examine the dot diagrams, they are a bit busy visually, but after a while you start to recognize subpatterns, and the subpatterns become mnemonic devices similar to the way one remembers the classical taxonomy of Biology, where the mnemonic is "Kings Play Chess On Fancy Green Sofas", which maps to "Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species" . . .

In the grand scheme of everything, I think that memorizing the various subpatterns, hence the complete pattern, probably is no more difficult than memorizing Jimmy Page's guitar parts on "Dazed And Confused" (Led Zeppelin) note-for-note, really . . .

"Dazed And Confused" (Led Zeppelin) -- London 1969 -- YouTube music video

Really! :doh:

And the reason I think your observation is brilliant is that it is simple to the point of being profoundly useful, since it is one of those great observations which is so obvious that most folks never notice it in any immediately conscious way, which is fabulous . . .

Fabulous! :guitar:

Edited by surfwhammy, 04 June 2012 - 06:08 AM.

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#17 busyfingers

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 12:10 PM

study theory and practice improvisation. I like to turn on the radio/youtube etc and just jam. this helps with improv. I think with solos its always better to keep them simple. this shows class and maturity in ones playing.



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